The Window

One of the high points of this past week was discovering that one of my all-time favorite bloggers has come out of hiding and started blogging again! If you’re not familiar with 23thorns, please take a few minutes to go check out his most recent post. I’ll wait.

Okay, now that you’re back, let’s get on with things. Reading his post about irrational childhood fears made me start thinking about my own childhood and some of the strange things I was afraid of. And thinking about that reminded me of what was pretty much the only good line in the Three Investigators movie that came out a few years ago:

“Why aren’t you afraid of the things you’re supposed to be afraid of?”

You see, I had these four aunts that I’ve mentioned a few times here in my blog. They had some pretty strange ideas of what was and was not appropriate for children. They thought nothing of waking my sisters and me in the middle of the night to take us out to the pier so we could watch the Coast Guard bring in a dead body. They also told us awful stories about ghosts that they swore they had actually seen; I don’t remember much about those stories, other than the fact that one ghost had an “Uncle Sam beard” and glowing eyes.

In short, I was never scared of ghosts or dead bodies. I had no fear of monsters or ghoulies or any of the things children with normal relatives are afraid of.

I was afraid of a window in the aunts’ basement. Terrified.

When we stayed with our aunts at their house in town, we all slept in the guest room in their basement. It was actually a very nice little guest room in a finished basement that included a formal sitting room with a fireplace. In retrospect, I’d have to say that their basement was nicer than the upstairs portion of any house I’ve ever lived in since.

Nothing scary about their basement.

Except for that window.

The guest room was in the farthest corner of the basement, and one had to cross the laundry room to get there. The bedroom was simply furnished, with a big double bed against the outside wall and a rollaway bed folded up beside it. When we were little, Aunt Marian would sleep down there with us, and we developed a complicated system to determine who got to sleep where. Marian slept in the middle of the big bed. The child who slept on Marian’s right was on “the new side” while the child on her left was on “the old side” and the child who got the rollaway was “out.”

My problems started on the nights when it was my turn to be on “the old side” because that’s where the window was.

My aunts had made the unusual decorating choice of hanging a full-length curtain covering the whole wall. Side-to-side, top-to-bottom, the entire wall was covered by curtains. There was nothing scary about the curtains themselves.

To my way of thinking, however, curtains covered windows. There was simply no other reason for a curtain to exist. It didn’t matter how many times my aunts tried to convince me that the only window on that wall was a tiny casement window near the ceiling; I remained firmly convinced that the whole surface behind that giant curtain was made of glass.

Still not so scary, you say? Oh, I beg to differ. (Or as Aunt Marian used to say: “I beg to diffy.” But that’s a subject for another day.)

Think about what would be on the other side of a window that made up an entire wall. A basement wall. I imagined worms and moles and underground beasties that would have no problem breaking the glass and snatching a sleeping child who was dumb enough to fall asleep when it was her turn to be on “the old side.”

Later, when we were big enough to sleep alone downstairs, we added a whole new level of terror to the basement bedroom. It was an older house, and there was no light switch at the bottom of the stairs. That meant turning off the light at the top of the stairs and making our way down the steps, across the laundry room, and into the bedroom in the dark.

In the basement.

A dark basement.

With a big, scary window.

I am the youngest, and probably still the most gullible of the three of us. I think it goes without saying that I was usually the loser at any kind of rock-paper-scissors or what-number-am-I-thinking or even eenie-meenie-miney-mo challenge to see who was going to be left alone at the top of the stairs to turn off the light after the other two made it safely into the bedroom.

It was me. It was always me. My big sisters would holler up at me when they had made it to the bedroom, and then it was my turn.

Let me just say for the record that we are not stupid women. None of us. So it escapes me now why it never occurred to any of us to just turn on the bedroom light for the poor, unfortunate sap stuck at the top of the stairs.

Which, in case you missed it, was me.

I would flip the switch and let out a bellow and take off, screaming all the way down the stairs and across the laundry room. As soon as my toes hit the threshold of the bedroom, I would launch myself through the air in the general direction of the bed — because apparently I assumed the basement creatures couldn’t get me if I never touched the carpeting.

Since my sisters were usually in the bed by that point, and because I’ve always better at launching than landing, my landings usually resulted in a bit of bruising and a lot of swearing. Which then led to one of the aunts flicking on the light and hollering down at us to settle down and watch our language.

Really, I swear we are not dumb people in my family. I promise.

We just do really dumb things.

For example, my oldest sister came home from college one weekend and rearranged the furniture in that basement bedroom. My aunts never rearranged furniture. Ever. Nothing ever changed in their home. Ever.

So it was completely logical for me to assume during my next stay with the aunts that the bedroom was arranged exactly the same as it had always been. Furniture simply did not move at my aunts’ house. Ever.

Even though I was in high school and staying at their house without my sisters on that particular weekend, I still followed the same bedtime routine I had always followed: turn off the light at the top of the stairs, sprint down them and across the laundry room, and go airborne into the nice, big bed that had always been there.

And which was now not there.

As I recall, I did a magnificent Berber face-plant and went into a long, slow skid toward the curtained wall. At that moment, I didn’t care about the rug burns on my face. All I could think of was Don’t break the window!

So, here I am, nearly fifty years old, and I have a lot of fears in my life. I’m afraid of my children being hurt, I’m afraid of thunderstorms, and I have a weird love-hate attitude toward maple trees. I still hate basements and would rather go up in a tornado than take shelter in a Michigan half-cellar. But nothing in life will ever terrify me as much as the window in my aunts’ basement.

What about you? What were you most afraid of as a child?

***

If you enjoyed this post and would like to read more about the aunts or my strange way of looking at life, please check out my book Have a Goode One available on Amazon for only $2.99.

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7 thoughts on “The Window

  1. I read this earlier and clicked like, and wanted to think about it a while. I can see how that window would scare you!
    Now, childhood fears of mine..the dark. When the lights went out and the house was quiet I just knew there was someone else in my room besides me. I had to have a ton of blankets on me so I could hide under them. I still have to have blankets on the bed in order to sleep. If there was someone in the room maybe they wouldn’t find me under all those blankets!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I am sort of the same way with the sheets. Doesn’t matter how hot it is, I MUST have at least a sheet covering me when I sleep. I’m not sure what I one flimsy little sheet is going to protect me from, but I feel safer that way.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I really enjoyed this post thank you!!! I can remember many things that scared me as a child. I lived in a huge house with many rooms and strange energies all around, there was a mirror in particular I was very afraid of. I feared that if I looked into it I would see someone else´s face. So I avoided it as crazy. I don´t know where did I get that idea but I never had the chance to see if my suspicions were right or not.

    Liked by 1 person

    • That reminds me of the old slumber party game my generation played. We’d go into a dark bathroom, face the mirror, and say “I don’t believe in Mary Beth” three times. It was supposed to bring a scary spirit out of the mirror . . . of course, it never did, but we were all terrified to go into the bathroom alone after that!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Great story!

    I feared little in my youth. I had a brother that loved educating his sisters all about strange and unusual news. He warned us about parking with our boyfriends on country roads, near railroad tracks or the cemetery. Oddly enough, my boyfriend and I loved parking in the cemetery. We didn’t have any live visitors and my boyfriend was pretty well known by the dead ones. His day job was keeping the lawn mowed and he also help set up for graveside services. ☕️❤️

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ah, we didn’t park in cemeteries where I grew up. I lived close to an airport back in the days before people had to worry about terrorists, so our favorite place to park was in the long-term parking lot at the airport. Never got caught. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Wonderfully told!! I grew up with an unfinished daylight basement. I absolutely hated it, all the dark corners, hated them. I can see how you would hate that window.

    Me? I hate the dark, still to this day. I hate stopping for gas at night.

    Like

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